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of the combined intellectual capacity of the management team, which, in the All Blacks’ case, was a team of 13 – including six players.” TALENT “There are a lot of talented people who don’t achieve the big goal and there are less talented people who do so because they’re more committed. They live the values, they’re driven, intrinsically their motivation is high – they just want to be successful. In some cases, with very talented people, the motivation is not as high and so they have to be driven by others. That’s not success. At Downer, I see them always trying to get better and keep evolving both as individuals and as teams within the big Downer team. It’s about developing talents and the All Blacks are about developing talent. If you develop the individuals within the team, you’re going to have a better team. In this, Downer has a lot in common with the All Blacks.” ‘S... HAPPENS’ “We had a saying in the All Blacks that the unexpected is going to happen and you’ve just got to handle it. In the Downer environment, the unexpected happens quite a lot, maybe on the roads or on a construction site. I’d like to see some of the workers getting involved in the decision-making when the unexpected happens. There are a lot of workers with a lot of expertise, practice and skill. Their opinions would be of real value to the leadership teams. Listening to them would be a huge step in the right direction, in my opinion. It would also go a long way to building their self-esteem.” GOALS “I guess everybody’s different, but I wrote down my goals pretty regularly. The All Blacks wrote down their goals every month; as a team and as individuals, they set goals and the strategies needed to achieve those goals. When I was in my late 20’s I wrote that being an All Blacks coach was one of my goals. That might sound ambitious but I achieved that goal in 2005 when I was 59. Another goal was to be a headmaster and for that I had to get some extra qualifications through Massey University. It was painful – and took me about seven years, part-time doing two or three papers a year. I was headmaster at Kelston Boys High for 10 years before becoming a professional rugby coach. It was good training. You had to be disciplined. My other goals were about family: I wanted a decent and enjoyable marriage where Raewyn and I both felt fulfilled. I wanted successful kids... I wanted to run my own business, which I’m doing now. Working with Downer is part of that business. The company is called 65 Plus for obvious reasons and I’m getting a lot of professional satisfaction from that.” BEING HAPPY “I’m 150 per cent a New Zealander: I just love this country and the majority of the people. I think we should be very proud of this place. The people who came for the Rugby World Cup 2011 went away with smiles on their faces – they enjoyed the experience, the people and the hospitality. It was the same for the Lions tour of 2005 – we gave the Lions a huge hiding but their supporters really enjoyed the tour because of what the New Zealand people did for them. What makes me happy is achieving the objectives that I set out for myself, having the family together on Waiheke, my five grandkids and three children. FEAR “What do I fear the most? Nothing … err … getting old, mate, I don’t like getting old. I’m trying to avoid that. I don’t want to stop, I want to continue trying to be productive. My philosophy is about keeping on trying to get better at what you do and the way you live your life, I guess. The All Black culture rubs off on people and the All Black culture was all about self-improvement.” WORLD CUP FINAL Speaking of fear, re-wind to 23 October 2011, Eden Park, Auckland ... The World Cup final ... New Zealand vs France ... and there we were, sitting on the edge of our seats in those desperate last minutes, terrified that the French might do it one more time. That’s how it was for us watching, so how was it for the All Blacks coach sitting up there in lonely isolation, high above the crowd at Eden Park? “Oh terrible! You know, you’re there having flashbacks to 2007 and the reaction of the media and some of the public.... you have flashbacks to that and you think, can you live in the country if you don’t win it? You think about your family, because they are the ones who are under pressure more than you, quite frankly, because they can’t do anything about it, they’re just crossing their fingers and hoping it’s going to be a good result. They know that if you don’t do the business what the reaction will be. So, your mother and Raewyn and the kids, they’re going through hell … more hell than you are. And you really worry that it’s not going to work out and what they’re going to have to put up with.” The final whistle … just one point in it … 8-7 to the All Blacks … and one enormous, collective sigh of relief from an emotionally exhausted and grateful nation. If you happen to get the chance to thank Ted for all his mighty efforts in winning the Cup, he’ll tell you: ‘The pleasure was all mine ….’ TED’S TALENT TIPS Sir Graham shared his views on talent development and self-improvement with Downer employees as he toured around Downer Depots from one end of New Zealand to the other. Follow the link to a series of short video clips that capture what he had to say. DOWNER / IN BLACK & WHITE / 7


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